Chapter Three Responses

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Chapter Three Responses

Post by SamZiegler on Thu May 25, 2017 3:54 pm

Vocabulary and Text Structure
When is figurative language used and to what effect?
Golding uses personification when describing the creepers in the forest. He writes, "... and the creepers dropped their ropes like the rigging of foundered ships." (pg. 56) I believe that this is done because the forest is home to the beast, according to the little kids. When the forest is personified, it gives a feeling that it is alive, and it makes for a creepier feeling about the forest. If the feeling associated with it is creepy, and the thought of the beast living there is in the back of everyone's head, then this would make the reader entertain the possibility that there may be something in the forest, if not the beast itself.
Inferences
How do the parts build to a whole?
In the first chapter, we see the beginnings of the power struggle between Ralph and Jack when the tribe elects Ralph as chief. Jack is only temporarily satisfied because Ralph lets him be in charge of the hunters. In chapter two, we see fractures begin to form in the tribe, as it becomes apparent that Jack dislikes Piggy. Jack also attempts to make the conch not count on the mountain. However, when we get to chapter three, the tribe really begins to split, between the hunters and Ralph's followers. They argue over what is more important for them, shelters or meat. Jack interprets what Ralph is saying incorrectly, he thinks Ralph is saying the hunter aren't working, which isn't what Ralph means. However, the damage is done, and from here, the tribe never goes back to the way they used to be.
Golding uses the title, Huts on the Beach, for chapter three. This is done because the huts symbolize home and safety to the little kids, and even the older kids feel some sort of comfort in them. They need this comfort with the thought of the beast still lurking in their heads. Also, huts are a main point of contention between Ralph and Jack in the chapter, as they disagree over what is more important, shelter or hunting. This argument ultimately splits the tribe between the hunters and Ralph's followers, and the tribe never recovers from this.
Word Study:
Contrite (pg. 50) Simon's contrite face appeared in the hole.
If someone is contrite, they are feeling or expressing remorse.
The boy's contrite face stared at the mess he made.
Tacit (pg. 55) Jack nodded, as much for the sake of agreeing as anything, and by tacit consent they left the shelter and went toward the bathing pool.
If something is tacit, it is understood or implied without being said.
The girl's silence was taken to mean tacit agreement.
Susurration (pg. 57) The deep sea breaking miles away on the reef made and undertone less perceptible than the susurration of the blood.
If something is susurrating, it is whispering or making a rustling sound.
The grass susurrated under his feet.

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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by Johnson chen on Fri May 26, 2017 9:42 pm

Vocabulary and Text Structure
When is figuarative language used and to what effect?
Golding uses personification to describe the forest. On pg. 48 he writes, "He passed hus tongue across dry lips and scanned the uncommunicative forest." He does this to show how the forest isn't so cooperated with the boys because this isn't their home and it's probably someone or somebody else's home. This personification gives a feeling like the forest has a mind of its own because Jack can't find any meat only footprints because the forest won't communicate with Jack or give him any help. And since the personification kind of makes the chapter or story more entertaining because the forest is kind of or sort of alive because uncommunicative and silent are very much human like description.
Key Details
How did the author develop the argument, explaination, or narrative?
Golding created argument when Ralph held the first meeting with the conch. He says things like everybody needs a job on this island and Jack goes and says me and my men will be the hunters and we'll hunt for meat, but Ralph says we need sheltet first. So as the time goes by Jack hasn't found any meat, Ralph has shelter but the shelter isn't very stable. When Jack comes back to the base, Ralph and Jack start arguing on the jobs because like Jack said me and my men will the do the hunting, but none of Jack's boys are hunting. Their just swimming in the water and having fun. While Ralph and Simon are making shelters for everyone to get away from the beast. So as time goes by things are getting bad because there's really no teamwork in these boys because one person wants meat and the other wants shelter, but they can't either of them if they don't have a better chief to teach them things.
Golding calls this chapter, Huts on the Beach, because huts are like homes to people and Ralph keeps saying we need shelter, but he can't really make one because no one is helping. So basically huts resemble a home and home is suppose to make you feel comfortable and safe from the bad things outside. And the huts really created a big problem in the chapter which will probably break the group up with Jack and Ralph's argument about shelter or hunting.
Word Study:
Vicissitudes (pg. 49) Jack stood there, streaming with sweat, streaked with brown earth, strained by all the vicissitudes of a day's hunting.
If someone or something is vicissitudes, then it is a change of circumstances or fortune, typically one that is unwelcome or unpleasant.
Her husband's sharp vicissitudes of fortune.
Inscrutably (pg. 56 ) The littluns watched him inscrutably over double handfuls of ripe fruits.
If someone or something is inscrutably, then it is impossible to understand or interpret.
Guy looked blankly inscrutable.
Riotous (pg. 57) With the fading of the light the riotous colors died and the heat and urgency cooled away.
If someone or something is riotous, then it is having a vivid, varied appearance.
A riotous display of bright red, green, and yellow vegetables

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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by BrandonN on Sat May 27, 2017 10:48 am

General Understanding
How did the author organize the ideas?
In chapter 3 the ideas are from Jack and Ralph the whole book so far jack has been just for hunting and wanting meat. Meanwhile the whole book Ralph has been trying to survive by building shelters and find a way off with the fire.This difference will split the tribe later in the book.
Vocabulary and Text Structure
When is figurative language used and to what effect?
This whole chapter has quite of bit of figurative language, the most noticeable is towards the end of the chapter when Golding describes the jungle having creepers closing in on them "so close that he left sweat on them", I believe this is as they think their being watched by the beast making the forest alive. Giving detail as such can provide a more in dept experience intriguing the reader.
  Golding uses "Huts on the beach" for chapter 3 because the huts are the shelters Ralph is trying to build but none of the boys are helping him. A hut is like a home a safe place which the boys need since they believe a beast is in the jungle.
Word Study:
  Vicissitudes (pg. 49) brown earth, stained by all the vicissitudes of a days hunting.
If something has vicissitudes it has a change of circumstances or fortune.
Being stranded on a island is very vicissitudes.
  Bewildered (pg.54) Ralph gazed bewildered at his rapt face.
If someone is bewildered they become perplexed and confused.
Someone coming out of a coma may be bewildered.
  Perceptible (pg.56) Simon turned away from them and went where the just perceptible path led him.
If something is perceptible they are able to be seen or noticed.
Mars is not perceptible without a telescope.

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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by MichaelNguyenPer4 on Sun May 28, 2017 11:18 am

Vocabulary & Text Structure
When is figurative language used and ti what effect?
Simile is used (48) "Jack was bent double. He was down like  a sprinter." A sprinter has trained for most of his/her life. However, within a short amount of time, Jack has already “trained” himself to become more savage in his own way of surviving the island.
Key Details
Which details support the key idea? Look for who? What? When? Where? Why? How much? How many?
Details that support the key idea in this chapter is that Ralph and Jack both control two different groups. Jack and his group has been hunting. While Ralph and his group are trying to make shelters (huts). This will causes the group to create issues since Jack has always been wanting to be the leader. Both are controlling their groups. While Ralph believes that we need more shelters then meat. When Jack believe that we need meat over shelter because most are hungry. Jack also argues that the agreement was that he and his hunters were exempt from building shelter because they needed meat to eat.
Why did Golding titled the third chapter "Huts on the Beach"? The title represents about the huts built on the beach. The chapter addresses the problem that the boys are faced with. They need food and want meat, but they also need shelter. Ralph and Simon argue with Jack because Ralph and Simon and a few others have worked very hard to build two shelters.
Inscrutably (56) "The littluns watched him inscrutably over double handfuls of ripe fruits."
Defintion - not easily understood; mysterious; unfathomable
Sentence - Someone is watching him inscrutably on the test.
Unintelligibly (56) "They talked, cried out unintelligibly, lugged him toward the trees."
Defintion - dull, stupid
Sentence - Someone is being really unintelligibly moody today.
Indignant (53) "Simon intent, Ralph incredulous and faintly indignant."
Definition - feeling, characterized by, or expressing strong displeasure at something considered unjust, offensive, insulting, or base
Sentence - If someone is indignant, he or she is more likely hated.

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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by its.amy.13 on Sun May 28, 2017 11:59 am

Inferences  
Where does the text leave matters uncertain or unstated?
          Why is Simon wondering off alone? What is Simon really looking for? Why is Simon the only one actually helping Ralph with the shelters? Could you consider Simon to be Ralph's "Guardian Angel"? Why does Simon seem to be mute for the most part? Why didn't Ralph or Jack say or do anything after they saw that Simon wasn't taking a bath? Seems to me that even though Simon was the only one helping Ralph with the shelters Simon wasn't all that important enough to Ralph to go looking for him. No one even notices when Simon wonders off. I wonder why no one cares enough about the boy to worry about him other than Piggy is chapter 2. Does the level of care towards the boy have something to do with his social skills? And why does Simon spend sooo much time alone instead of with the boys his own age?

Chapter 3- Huts on the Beach
In this chapter, Ralph is more concerned for the shelters that need to be built while Jack is more concerned for the pigs he must slay for meat. For most of the chapter was spent arguing about which had a greater value the shelter or the meat. Clearly, no one was willing to help Ralph out with building the huts except Simon because they were all off playing, wondering, or hunting. The huts were the most important thing that needed to get done before nightfall, but they didn't get finished because no one else contributed. I guess Golding named this because of the importance of the matter.

1. Antagonism(51)-"Now the antagonism was audible."
active hostility or opposition.
2. Gesticulated(50)-"He gesticulated, sought for a word."
use gestures, especially dramatic ones, instead of speaking or to emphasize one's words.
3. Clamorously(56)-" Tall trunks bore unexpected pale flowers all the way up to the dark canopy where life went on clamorously."
making a loud and confused noise.


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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by aya on Sun May 28, 2017 5:30 pm

1) Inferences – How do the parts build to a whole?
- On page 51, Ralph says, “I bet if I blew the conch this minute, they’d come running. Then we’d be, you know, very solemn, and someone would say we ought to build a jet, or a submarine, or a TV set. When the meeting was over they work for five minutes, then wander off or go hunting.” This is kind of where all the problems started. Everyone started to get lazy; they only want to have fun and not deal with the consequences of preparing for survival. They wanted shelter and food provided for them without having to work. Neither would they listen to Ralph in their meetings. Oder and rules all vanished, so chaos would start soon.
2) Vocabulary and text structure – what role the individual paragraphs, sentences, phrases, or words play?
- On page 51, jack keeps repeating “we want meat” he keeps using it as an excuse for why he hunts all day and doesn’t help with the shelter and fire and other things. But I think jack has an obsession of proving himself to be the one that should be in charge, I think if he caught a pig and served it to the kids; they would see him as important. He likes the thought of power and hunting is the only way he can get it. He’s also been jealous of Ralph ever since he’s been picked to be the leader. So to me, “we want meat” is his way of saying “I want to be in charge” or “I want to be leader.”
This chapter is named “Huts on the Beach” because Ralph realized he had no control of the kids on the island when none of them worked on building the huts on the beach. No matter how many meeting he calls, they won’t listen to him. And I think he realizes that things are getting bad. In a way, the huts represent his power, a small amount, and badly built, ready to fall.
1) Convey (51) – to convey something, is to make an idea, impression, or feeling known or understandable to someone.
- He tried to convey the compulsion to track down and kill that was swallowing him up.
2) Maddening (49) - something that is maddening, is extremely annoying; infuriating.
- From the pig-run came the quick, hard patter of hoofs, a castanet sound, seductive, maddening- the promise of meat.
3) Solemn (51) – someone that is solemn is characterized by deep sincerity.
- Then we’d be, you know, very solemn, and someone would say we ought to build a jet, or a submarine, or a TV set.

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Chapter 3

Post by MNguyen23 on Sun May 28, 2017 6:45 pm

Vocab-Text Structure
When is fig language used and to what effect?

It is used on pg 49" Silence of the forest was more oppressive than the heat and at this day there wasn't even the whine of insects"
This states that the author is comparing how the heat-temp of the sun is being compared to sound of the forest in which both seem calm- as well as quiet.

Vocab-Text
When is fig language used
On pg 48 Golding describes the forest as " incooperative by its flaws" such as the things in their that are starting problems. Such as objects, the huts, set of rules to follow by

Contrite: To feel a little remorse
Solemn: to be sincere, nice or kind
Tacit: To feel implied

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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by TheShadow on Sun May 28, 2017 10:29 pm

Vocabulary & Text Structures:
When is figurative Language used and to what effect?
In page 58, "He looked in the pool for his reflection, but his breathing troubled the mirror." The figurative language used in the story was used to the point of showing someone characteristic or mood.

Author's Purpose:
What is the author's purpose for writing?
The author's purpose for writing this story was to inform but to also entertain, because in the story he wanted to explain cycle of evil and how without the code of conduct there would be a lot of evil roaming around in their society.

Golding used the title "Huts on the beach", barbecue the Ralph and his group start to make shelters on the island to sleep in and to be civilized while they wait it out on the island for help and survive.

Avidly: In page 45, "Then the trail, frustration, claimed him again and he searched the ground avidly." Meaning showing great enthusiasm for or interest in something. Example, I avidly was searching a game that I had wanted to play today.

Furtive: In page 45, "...became less a hunter than a furtive thing...." Meaning taken, done, used, etc., surreptitiously or by stealth. Example, a magician is furtive when it comes to magic tricks and showing them off.

In drawn: In page 45, " with a hiss indrawn breath...." Meaning reserved; introspective. Example, I have indrawn a gun for someone. In the later future.


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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by ZavionGuy on Sun May 28, 2017 11:02 pm

1.
Vocabulary & Text Structure
When is figurative language used and to what effect?
On page 48 it says, "Jack went double. He was down like a sprinter, his nose only a few inches from the humid earth...Then dog-like, uncomfortably on all fours yet unheeding his discomfort, he stole forward five yards and stopped." This shows how Jack is slowly but surely turning into more of a savage the longer he stays on the island and hunts.

Key Details
How did the author develop the argument, explanation, or narrative?
Golding developed the argument between Jack and Ralph by showing how frustrated Ralph was with the shelter. On page 50 it says, "Ralph looked up, frowning, from the complication of leaves." This led to Ralph arguing with Jack about how some tasks are more important than others.
2.
Golding uses the title, "Huts on the Beach" because the huts symbolize civilization which Simon, Piggy, Ralph want and this shows because they are trying to build them. Jack and all the other boys don't want to work on it because they are starting to turn into savages and they are less mature then the three other boys.
3.
Clarity page 53, If something has clarity then it is clear to a person. "Jack drew up his legs, clasped his knees, and frowned in an effort to attain clarity." The situation needs clarity.

Opaque page 53, If something is opaque then it is not see through or not transparent. "The opaque, mad look came into his eyes again." The cup is opaque.

Astonished page 52, If someone is astonished then the person is greatly surprised or impressed. "Astonished at the interruption, they look up at Simon's serious face." The man was astonished when he saw the bee.

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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by _Karlitos :v on Sun May 28, 2017 11:05 pm

*Text depending questions
-Inferences
How do the parts build to a whole?
Parts of different passages of this chapter exemplify how are Jack and the other boys are starting to act wilder. For example, in pg. 48 ,in this passage: "His sandy hair considerably longer than it had been when they dropped in, was lighter now; and his bare back was a mass of dark freckles and peeling sunburn. A sharpened stick about 5 feet long trailed from his right hand, and exept for a pair of tattered shorts held up by his knife belt he was naked. Golding is suggesting that Jack's appearance is turning the opposite of the appearance of a person who lives in a civilized communit. In other words, Jack starts to look more "savage" and less like a student ruled by strict school rules, what he used to be and look like. Also in pages 51 and 54, Jack repeatedly says : "But we want the meat!" when Ralph asks him why didn't Jack and his "hunters" help him to build the huts; and instead they went to unsuccessfully hunt a pig. This suggests that Jack is losing his common sense and it is being replaced with and insatiable desire of hunting, just like when carnivore/omnivore wild animals need food. In other words, he is starting to act like an animal. Finally, I would like to mention that in chapter 2, pg. 42, Jack said "We are not savages, we are English."What an irony!
-Whose story is not presented?
Thoughout this chapter, Golding focused more on the character development of Ralph, Jack, and Simon; while Piggy has been mentioned just once in pg. 54. We don't exactly know what has he been doing all this time, nor how has he changed, we can just have and idea of how does he feel about his current situation due to what the other chapters suggested about him and his personality.
-Whi did the author titled the 3rd chapter as "Huts on the Beach"?
Because in this chapter, the enmity between Ralph and Jack starts because Jack and his "hunters" didn't help Ralph in building the huts for sheltering themselves in the beach. And the antagonism between them is so important for the story development.
-Words i don't know:
*brim (pg. 50): "Jack took up a coconut shell that brimmed with fresh water from among a group that was arranged in the shade, and drank." Friendly definition of _brim (verb): When you fill something until you can't fill it anymore. Sentence with brim: She filled the glass until brimming it.
*contrite (pg. 50): "Simon's contrite face appeared in the hole." Friendly definition of _contrite: When someone feels guilty. Sentence with contrite: A contrite conscience.
*to flinch(pg. 52): "The two older boys flinched when they heard the shamerful syllable." Friendly definition of _flinch: When you do a quick, nervous movement of the face or body. Sentence with flinch: They flinched at the roughness of his voice.

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Chapter 3 Responses

Post by Megan G on Mon May 29, 2017 7:45 pm

Inferences
Where does the text leave matters uncertain or unstated?

The text doesn't tell us why Simon goes off on his own or why he's the only one helping Ralph build the huts. While Simon goes and wanders off, Ralph and Jack are bickering, like always. Seems as if Ralph doesn't care that much about Simon to go and look or even wonder where he is. Then, he goes and complains about how no one is helping him.

Inferences
Whose story/perspective is not represented?

Although he is mentioned once in the chapter, Piggy is not in the chapter as much as he was in the first 2 chapters. We don't see how he is helping Jack or Ralph in any way in the chapter. Piggy usually helps Ralph and defends him but we have no clue where he is in the chapter.

Vocabulary:
festooned (pg. 48) "The tree trunks and the creepers that festooned them lost themselves..."
Friendly Definition: adorn (a place) with ribbons, garlands, or other decorations.

pendant (pg. 48) "Here was a loop of creeper with a tendril pendant from a node."
Friendly Definition: a piece of jewelry that hangs from a chain worn around the neck.

inscrutable (pg. 49) "Jack lifted his head and stared at the inscrutable masses of creeper that lay across the trail."

vicissitudes (pg. 49) "Jack stood there, streaming with sweat, streaked with brown earth, stained by the vicissitudes of a day's hunting."
friendly Definition: a change of circumstances or fortune, typically one that is unwelcome or unpleasant.

indignant (pg. 53) "They were silent again: Simon intent, Ralph incredulous and faintly indignant."
Friendly Definition: feeling or showing anger or annoyance at what is perceived as unfair treatment.

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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by Karen P on Mon May 29, 2017 7:51 pm

Vocabulary and text structure.
• Why may have the author chosen littlun over little one?
Because of the definition of littlun that described a little kid (little + one) and a little animal, Folding might choose this word since this also talk about an irrational being that acts because of its impulses and wilderness, somehow telling the attitude of the kids and how they act in front of some situations. Just as chapter 2 when they act like a bunch of kids running to make fire. Running wild to the open ocean and have fun.
Inferences
• Where does the text leave matters uncertain or unstated?
The author left unstated Jacks feelings somehow, the fiesta page of the chapter describe the situation that he is going through and how is he acting to it, but about his feeling Ralph tries to talk about it and Jack avoid the statement that he loves hunting, killing; making the reader realize that that is probable that he does love killing, and maybe this could bring a huge problem to the evil topic.
The third name of the Book LOTF named "Huts on the Beach" brings up the importance of feeling related to the place, a home as Ralph said. This represents the human settlement as an adult would do (the evil ones that created the war) and how following the others steps that had made mistakes would bring mistakes.
Word Study:
Solemn (page 51): "...Then we’d be, you know, very solemn, and someone would saywe ought to build a jet, or a submarine, or a TV set..."
Formal and dignified.
Tacit (page 54): "Jack nodded, as much for the sake of agreeing as anything, and by tacit consent they left the shelter and went toward the bathing pool."
Understood or implied without being stated.
Incredulous (page 53): "said Piggy incredulously"
(Of a person or their manner) unwilling or unable to believe something.

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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by Zhiwei Huang on Mon May 29, 2017 10:30 pm

Vocabulary & Text Structure
How can meaning be altered by changing key words?
On page 48 when describing Jack's stance, Golding uses "sprinter" to describe it. If Golding had just said he was on all fours instead of sprinter, it wouldn't have given the impression of Jack being ready to run.
Inferences
How do the parts build to a whole?
In chapter 3 it starts off with Jack hunting. When Jack makes it back to camp he argues with how hunting or making shelter is more important. This is important because it starts to build up the tense of leadership between Jack and Ralph as they fight over which is more important they start to drift apart in goals.

This Chapter is named "Huts on the Beach" because the huts are shelter for the kids and because the kids are scared of the beast they need shelter, also the building of shelter causes the argument between Jack and Ralph.

gesticulate- using dramatic gestures instead of speaking (page 50) "He gesticulated, sought for a word."
Vicissitudes- change of fortune or situation, normally into something bad (page 49) "stained by all the vicissitudes of a day's hunting."
inscrutable- impossible to understand or interpret (page 56) "The littluns watched him inscrutably over double handfuls of ripe fruit."

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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by Cory James on Wed May 31, 2017 9:17 pm

Inferences

How do the parts build to a whole?

At the start of chapter one you see that Jack, and Ralph rival each other. Throughout the book Golding shows two alpha males attempting to work with each other, instead of immediately fighting each other. On pg.51 Jack says “we want meat” and eventually Ralph says “we need shelters”. This conversation shows them butting heads, more importantly it shows what these characters think is more important to their survival.

Inferences

Where does the text leave matters uncertain or unstated?

In the text Simon wanders off but we don’t know why he is wandering off. It is also weird that no one notices that he is gone. Does Simon know something that the other don’t know? I wonder why he was the only one to help Ralph, why didn’t he go out to play like the other kids.

I think the chapter is named huts on the beach because that is where most of the groups concerns are, and that was the most important thing to get done. It eventually turns out to be a situation where everyone wants a hut but only two people work together to make them. In this chapter however Jacks main focus is finding meat.

Word study

Unintelligibly: (pg. 56) "They talked, cried out unintelligibly, lugged him toward the trees."

Definition: dull or stupid

Sentence: The man had an unintelligible conversation with a child

Vicissitudes: (pg. 49) “Jack stood there, streaming with sweat, streaked with brown earth, strained by all the vicissitudes of a day's hunting.”

Definition: An alternation between opposite or contrasting things.

Sentence: This is a period of powerful, sometimes of terrible, vicissitudes.

Bewildered: (pg. 54) “Ralph gazed bewildered at his rapt face.”

Definition: Cause (someone) to become perplexed and confused

Sentence: She raised her head slowly as if she were dizzy and bewildered

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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by cesar.ca on Wed May 31, 2017 9:54 pm

-Where does the text leave matters uncertain or unstated?
---At the end of the chapter three, Piggy is asking about Simon and where he was. Why did he leave and where did he go? Simon went off to be alone. I see Simon as the most curious and aware of all the children on the island. He doesn't have the grown-up, scientific sense of Piggy or the political strength or awareness of Ralph, but he is smart in a more general sense. He has gone away to be alone with himself on this island, to sense what it means to be there, what it smells like and looks like.

-What is revealed about Simon?
---In this chapter, Jack had gone to hunt and Simon stayed back to help Ralph work on building huts.  Simon is the only one out of the group besides Ralph that has stuck with the building of the huts.  The others went to play or explore.  However, as evening draws near Simon is not in camp and the two boys discuss that he has gone off. The boys decide he is odd.  Simon is small and thin. He has long black hair. Simon is very concerned about the Littlluns, the small children on the island.  He expresses concern about their crying in the night.  He takes them on a trek to find fruit and helps to feed them.  He then goes off to hide by himself for a while. We learn that Simon is a caring person but he is also a loner who needs to get away from the others at times and connect with nature.  He has a special peace and goodness in his personality.

Key Words:
1. Oppresive "The silence of the forest was more oppresive than the heat..." (49): using power unjustly; burdensome
2. Inscrutable "Jack lifted his head and stared at the inscrutable masses of creeper..." (49): difficult to understand, mysterious
3. Declivities "But Jack was pointing to the high declivities that led down from the mountain..." (54): downward slopes, as of a hill.

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Chapter Three Response

Post by Broseph:D on Thu Jun 01, 2017 9:33 pm

Questions:
How did the author organize the ideas?
Golding had to create similar ways that a normal citizen would be living and how the boys on the island are living. There has to be moments in when rest is needed to live for another day so huts were add into the story.
How do the parts build to whole?
Since Jack and Ralph want the best for everyone, they would have to agree on some parts with each other. The best way to keep everyone interacting with each other while trying to stay alive, they make sure to make the huts so no one gets lonely without the adults and parents.

The reason the chapter is called "Huts on the Beach" is for a representation of safety in the story. There is little to no safety on a island so it was best to make comfortable as possible while making a plan to get rescued.

Word Study:
Madden: "... a castanet sound, seductive, madding—the promise of heat."(pg.49) Make someone annoyed of you. Sentence: it was obvious that Matt was madding sally during the party.
Critically: "Ralph looked at him critically through his tangle of fair hair.(pg.53) Expressing disapproval. Sentence: My boss had a critically look on his face when I told him my excuse of being late to work.
Perceptible: "...the reef made an undertone less perceptible than the susurration of the blood."(pg.58) able to be seen or noticed. Sentence: The hole on the wall was perceptible to everyone in the room during the sleepover.

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Re: Chapter Three Responses

Post by Manthan21 on Tue Jun 06, 2017 5:50 pm

When is figurative language used and to what effect?
On pg. 56 Golding writes, "... and the creepers dropped their ropes like the rigging of foundered ships." He uses personification to describe the creepers. he does this so the readers can understand how and what the creepers look like.

What is the author's purpose for writing?
The author's purpose for writing this story was to inform but to also entertain, because he explains how evil is around the island and also says how rules are needed in order to keep piece on the island

Golding named the chapter he did because in that chapter this is after all the kids knew about the beast everyone wanted to build a hut

Contrite (pg. 50) Simon's contrite face appeared in the hole.
If someone is contrite, they are feeling or expressing remorse.
The boy's contrite face stared at the mess he made
Tacit (page 54): "Jack nodded, as much for the sake of agreeing as anything, and by tacit consent they left the shelter and went toward the bathing pool."
Astonished page 52, If someone is astonished then the person is greatly surprised or impressed. "Astonished at the interruption, they look up at Simon's serious face." The man was astonished when he saw the bee.




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Re: Chapter Three Responses

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