Chapter Seven Respones

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Chapter Seven Respones

Post by SamZiegler on Tue May 30, 2017 4:02 pm

Key Details
Are there any shifts or patterns in the writing? Look for signal words and phrases?
In chapter seven, there is a key shift when the hunters and Ralph are climbing up the mountain. Jack says that he is going to see if the beast is there, and asks if anyone is coming. In this moment, we see a shift in the hunters. They have acted tough throughout the book, yet when they are confronted with the possibility of encountering the beast in the dark, they all make excuses about why they can't go. Ralph is the only person who steps forward to go with Jack, in a moment that is more about not letting Jack beat him than anything else. This shift is a very big part of this chapter, as it show that the hunters are not as tough as they try to make themselves appear, and it also reminds us that they are kids, scared of the dark and monsters. In this moment, we see a little bit of humanity from them, which is the last time we really see it until the book ends.
Key Details
Are there any nuances in meaning?
At the part of the chapter where Ralph, Jack, and Roger are climbing up the mountain, there is a nuance in how the boys and the environment are described. On page 122, the boys' appearances are described as "...changed from ink stains to distinguishable figures." I think this is done to symbolize how Jack and Roger might be dark and evil, but in this moment, they are frightened kids, about to confront a nightmare. They change from ink stains, a very dark color, to distinguishable figures, which shows this change. This is all happening while it is nighttime, and consequently, it is dark. The darkness symbolizes the beast, and the fact that it stays just as dark all of the time shows how the beast inside of the boys is always there. This is a very subtle difference in colors between Jack and Roger, and the beast, but it is very important and gives valuable insight into how they felt climbing up that mountain.
Golding uses the title, Shadows and Tall Trees, for chapter seven. This is done to represent the boys going through the forest while they are attempting to find the pig. The boys are represented by shadows here because shadows are associated with darkness, horror, and fear. This surrounds the hunters, and for a second during the game with Robert as a pig, it gets to Ralph. The boys are slowly transforming from innocent students into murderers and hunters, and this is quite clearly shown in this title.
Word Study:
Furtively (pg. 109) He looked round, furtively.
If someone is furtive, they attempt to avoid attention or notice
The boy was furtive during his presentation.
Luxuriance (pg. 116) For most of the way they were forced right down to the bare rock by the water and had to edge along between that and the dark luxuriance of the forest.
If vegetation is luxuriant, it is rich and profuse in growth.
The trees were luxuriant.
Scuttling (pg. 120) There came the sound of boys scuttling away.
If someone is scuttling, they are running hurriedly with short, quick steps.
The mouse scuttled back into its hole.

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Re- Chapter Seven Response

Post by BrandonN on Wed May 31, 2017 10:23 pm

Inferences
Where does the test leave matters uncertain or unstated?
Vocabulary & Text Structure
Why does the author begin and end where they do?
Golding in chapter 7 starts with the boys going on a hunt which they end up going for the beast. Towards the end Jack sees the beast so the other boys go help him, Golding describes the beast very vividly but we never find out who or what the beast is he ends it there. I think this is done to create suspense and intrigue the reader to make them read the next chapter.
  In Chapter 7 Golding use the title, "Shadows and Tall Trees" because the shadows are the boys as you see when the boys pretend that Robert is the pig and stab him playfully you see that the boys are becoming more and more violent. While the tall trees are the forest the boys are going through.
Word Study:
Furtively (pg.109) He looked round, furtively. Apparently no one had
If you do something furtively you do it in a way that attempts to avoid notice or attention.
Ninjas always do things in a furtively way.
Gleaming (pg.113) track toward him, with tusks gleaming and an intimating.
If something is gleaming its shining bright.
Apprehension (pg.113) Ralph was full of fright and apprehension and pride.
If you do something with apprehension you feel anxiety or fear that something bad or unpleasant will happen.
When I walk down a alley I feel much apprehension.

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Chapter 7

Post by MNguyen23 on Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:56 pm

Vocabulary and text structure
When is figurative language used and to what effect?
on pg 110 Golding uses figurative language " now the sea would suck down making cascades and waterfalls of retreating water would sink past the rocks and plaster down the seaweed like shining hair. The author uses personification to give the water human qualities. It's used to describe how powerful the sea is as well as powerful the force of the waves can be.
Key Details
Are there any nuances in meaning?
At the part of the chapter where jack roger and ralph are climbing up the mountain, there is a nuance in how the boys and theur surroundings are being described. On page 122, the boys' appearances are described as "...changed from ink stains to distinguishable figures." This to me states that Jack and Roger seem to be acting bad like evil but in reality they're acting like bad immature kids that don't understand what they're even doing. In my opinion the dark symbolizes evil since it has a bad clinging feeling to the text.

The author uses the title shadow and tall trees as the title in order to give us a way to think how the boys were able to get through the hard tough environment like the forest.
Vocab
Scuttling: running in small little baby steps
Gleaming: to be tracking down
Furtively: to avoid major attention from someone or something

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CHAPTER SEVEN RESPONSE

Post by MichaelNguyenPer4 on Thu Jun 01, 2017 4:44 pm

Key Details
Are there any shifts or patterns in the writing? Look for signal words and phrases.
A shift occurs (109) “Be sucking my thumb next—” Ralph is beginning to speak of his time on the island that he began to lose his way of life and maturity. He's realizing that sucking on his thumb and biting his nails are not only signs of nerves, but signs of immaturity as well. Maybe Ralph is acting this way to relieve some of the things he has lost away from society.
Vocabulary & Text Structure
When is figurative language used and to what effect?
Foreshadowing is used in this sentence “Use a littlun,” said Jack, and everybody laughed. This foreshadows Jack’s murderer & savage nature. He starts to joke around about killing people instead of pigs, but before he realizes it, this wish will become real. We also see that Jack doesn’t see littluns as equal human beings.
Why did Golding titled chapter seven "Shadows and Tall Trees"?
In chapter seven, "Shadows and Tall Trees," the boys risk their dangerous journey into the dense jungle to search for the beast.  The connotation of "shadows and tall trees" suggests a frightening, dark atmosphere.
Indignantly (114) ""I hit him," said Ralph Indignantly."
Definition - feeling, characterized by, or expressing strong displeasure at something considered unjust, offensive, insulting, or base
Sentence - Someone indignantly came in, starting to destroy stuff.
Traverses (116) "...lengthy traverses where one used hands as well as feet."
Definition - to pass or move over, along, or through
Sentence - You will traverses through the years.
Diminishing (123) "...hung up there immovable on the top of a diminishing, moving mountain."
Definition - to make or cause to seem smaller, less, less important, etc.; lessen; reduce
Sentence - If diminishing the laws, may cause a huge problems.

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Chapter 7 Responses

Post by Megan G on Thu Jun 01, 2017 8:17 pm

Vocabulary & Text Structure
When is figurative language used and to what effect?

Foreshadowing is used when Jack and the other boys reenact the boar chase and Robert pretends to be the boar. Eventually, they loose sight of the fact that they're only playing a game and almost kill Robert. They remember that they're only playing a game and stop. Robert suggests that next time they use a real boar, Jack says "use a littlun" everyone laughs at Jack's joke. This is foreshadowing Simon's death.

Key Details
Are there any shifts or patterns in the writing?

In the chapter, there's a shift when Ralph and the other boys are going up the mountain. Jack then says that he's going to see if the beast is there and he asks if anyone is going to join him. Here, we see the shift of the hunters mood. They act really tough in the other chapters, but then when they're asked to see if there's a beast (in the dark), they're scared and they all make excuses as of why they can't go. Ralph then steps up and says he'll go up. This shift is important because it shows that the hunters act tougher than they actually are and this shows that they're just little boys who are scared of things like this, the dark and monsters in particular.

I think this chapter is called Shadows and Tall Trees because the boys go through the forest to find the beast. I think the boys represent the shadows because shadows represent darkness, and fear.


Vocabulary

furtively (pg. 109) "He looked round, furtively."
Friendly Definition - in a way that attempts to avoid notice or attention; secretively.

mirage (pg. 110) "The filmy enchantments of mirage could not endure the cold ocean water and the horizon was hard, clipped blue.
Friendly Definition - an optical illusion caused by atmospheric conditions, especially the appearance of a sheet of water in a desert or on a hot road caused by the refraction of light from the sky by heated air.

brandished (pg. 116) "Jack brandished his spear."
Friendly Definition - wave or flourish (something, especially a weapon) as a threat or in anger or excitement.





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Re: Chapter Seven Respones

Post by aya on Thu Jun 01, 2017 9:16 pm

Key details - How did the author develop the argument, explanation, or narrative?
on page 118, when Ralph asked Jack how he got to the top of the mountain on his last expedition, Jack was sneering and glowering at Ralph. “Ralph sighed, sensing the rising antagonism, understanding that this was how jack felt as soon as he ceased to lead.” He is saying that as soon as Ralph took over leading by asking jack questions, jack got angry. Because he believes he's the one that should be leading. Because he thinks, “I'm the one who can sing and hunt, so I deserve to lead.” He sees himself better than all the other kids on the island. It’s safe to assume that Jack is cocky, and the way he lived before he got on the island can have something to do with that.

2) Why did the author name this chapter “Shadows and Tall Trees”
This chapter is called “Shadows and Tall Trees” because Ralph, Jack, and some other kids went on an expedition to find the beast. They went through the pig-run, which had a lot of tall trees. I also think the “shadows” part was talking about roger, because he was hiding in the shadows when Jack asked him if he wanted to go with them to find the beast.

1) ceaseless (110) - “You could follow with your eye the ceaseless, bulging passage of the deep sea waves.”
If something is ceaseless, it is constant and unending.
She was tired of the ceaseless struggle of work.
2) Bargained (112) - “They went more slowly than Ralph had bargained for.”
If you bargained for something, you be prepared for, or expect.
She was going through more than she bargained for.
3) Impassable (116) - “After that the rock seemed to be growing impassable so they sat for a time..”
If something is impassable, it is impossible to travel around or over.
On our journey, we went through impassable-like rocks.

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Re: Chapter Seven Respones

Post by Johnson chen on Thu Jun 01, 2017 9:18 pm

Vocabulary & Text Structure
When is figurative language used and to what effect?
Foreshadowing is use when the boys play the hunting game where one kid pretends to be the pig and the others try to kill him. But the reason why this is important is that when the boys were playing they almost kill Robert the boy who was the boar. Robert also said that they should use a real boar next time, but mean ugly Jack said or a littlun. When he said this, I think this was the end of Simon's life even though Ralph said this to Simon, that he'll make out of here.
Key Details
Are there any shifts or patterns in the writing? Look for signal words and phrases?
When every hunter and Ralph go hunting they're not afraid to kill the pig or boar, but when they go hunting for the beast everybody acts like a pussy showing that they aren't as tough as they are when hunting pigs. The only one who's actually touch enough to fight the beast is Jack and Jack basically defeats the beast, but the others are also showing fear which is like a human characteristic that having been showing since everybody hunts.
Golding calls this chapter, Shadows and Tall Trees, because the boys go off hunting the beast and trying to find where he's at. The boys represent the shadows because shadows are dark and dark usually means fear too. And the tall trees represnt the beast because he's an big obstacle to go through in the forest.
Daunting (pg.119) The word was toi good, too bitter, too successfully daunting to be repeated.
If something is daunting, then it is seeming difficult to deal with in anticipation; intimidating.
A daunting task.
Queer (pg.117) Jack cleared his throat and spoke in a queer, tight voice.
If someone is a queer, then he or she is strange; odd.
She had a queer feeling that they were being watched.
Moors (pg.112) He lived in a cottage on the edge of the moors.
If someone is a moor, then it is a tract of open uncultivated upland; a heath.
A walk on the moor.

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Re: Chapter Seven Respones

Post by _Karlitos :v on Thu Jun 01, 2017 11:49 pm

*Text depending questions
-Key details
Are there any nuances in the meaning?
pg. 120: "A dark figure moved against the tide. Roger? 'That's three, then.'"
Yes, when Golding used the word "dark" to describe the emergence of Roger to Ralph and Jack, he meant that when he was just approaching Ralph ans Jack could just see him as a shadow, but he also meant that Roger is a "dark" character, "dark" in his personality and appearance.
There is more evidence for my conclusion about Golding's choice of usind "dark" for describing Roger in pg. 102 in this passage: "Roger, uncommunicative by nature, said nothing. He offered no opinion on the beast nor told Ralph why he had chosen to come on this mad expedition. Roger was banging his silly wooden stick against something." Because the author uses the phrases: uncommunicative by nature, no opinion on the beast, banging his silly wooden stick against something. These phrases illustrate Roger as a mysterious and gloomy character.
-Inferences
Where does the text leave matters uncertain or unstated?
pg. 112: "Mummy had still been with them and daddy has come home every day." This passage is a flashback Ralph had during his searching for the beast. Golding leaves unclear what happened to Ralph's mother. Did she abandoned Ralph? Did she died?
-Why did the author titled the seventh chapter as "Shadows and tall trees"
Because Ralph and the boys in their looking-for the beast, were surrounded by a dense jungle, and a jungle is always full of tall trees and shadows of the trees, rocks, and animals.
*Words I don't know:
-furtively: "He looked round, furtively."Friendly definition of _Furtively: Something done without being seen or perceived. Sentence with furtively: Furtively, she went into her brother's room to take back her stolen flute.
-loited: "They went more slowly than Ralph had bargained for; yet in a way he was glad to loiter, cradling his spear." Friendly definition of _loited: When you stand or wait arround without apparent purpose. Sentence with loited: I was loitering arround the schol during lunch.
-crestfallen:"'I don't remember this cliff,' said Jack, crestfallen." Friendly definition of _crestfallen: When you are sad and disappointed. Sentence with crestfallen: When my boss fired me yesterday I left, crestfallen.

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Re: Chapter Seven Respones

Post by Karen P on Fri Jun 02, 2017 9:15 am

General Understanding:
How did the author organize the ideas?
Golding organize the idea by topics, these topics are represented by the characters, even not the main characters represent something; this far you can realize who represents what: Ralph represents reason, along the book with Piggy who is science and logic, while Simon is more and spiritual representation. Whereas Jack is the desire of power and Roger the one percent of the population that is evil. Golding debates often the reason with the desire of power to illustrate the meaning of how desire is made of no reasoning; in this chapter the main problem between both is who goes up and climb the mountain to look for the beast, debating and trying to show who is better.

Key Details:
Are there any nuances in meaning?
Some that are necessary to understand the complementary each character is. Seems odd that Ralph could get along with Jack without fighting, and having some agreements, just as the beginning of the chapter were they are on the beach in harmony, even with Roger -that is evil and no control-, here we can acknowledge that the two different characters must be together to overcome situations (Jack and Ralph), somehow necessary on the real world to, but Roger, I wonder the importance of Roger as a useful collaborator?

The name of the seventh Chapter is "Shadows and Tall Trees". I think the reason of this name is the situations on the kids are, they go to search for the beast, in this case at night they are the shadows that jump and go through the forest. But the Tall Trees might represent the idea that, after all over the forest they are small and as Jack said "what was the use of three of them?" on page 120; realizing the small they are to the situation, to the forest they are confronting.

Word Study:
1. Indulged (page 109): "They were bitten down to the quick though he could not remember when he had restarted this habit nor any time when he indulged it."
to yield to an inclination or desire; allow oneself to follow one's will (often followed by in):
2. Furtively (page 109): "He looked round, furtively."
done in a quiet and secretive way to avoid being noticed
3. Obtuse (page 111): "...but here, faced by the brute obtuseness of the ocean, the miles of division, one was clamped down, one was helpless, one was condemned, one was—"
not quick or alert in perception, feeling, or intellect; not sensitive or observant; dull.

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Re: Chapter Seven Respones

Post by Cory James on Mon Jun 05, 2017 10:55 pm

Inferences

Where does the text leave matters uncertain or unstated?

On pg.112 Ralph thinks to himself about his life before they got stranded, "Mummy had still been with them and daddy had come home every day." This passage leaves the audience wondering if something happened to his mother while growing up. He also talks about his dad being home every day, did his dad later on stop coming home daily? Was his dad gone for several days at a time? This passage leaves matters uncertain in the sense that we don’t know much about what happened to Ralph’s parents.

Key Details

Are there any shifts or patterns in the writing? Look for signal words and phrases.

There is a shift in the book at the point where jack asks if anyone wants to come with him to the top of the mountain to look for the beast, and everyone all the sudden doesn’t want to come. The hunters have been portrayed as tough and fearless up to this point but now they want to act scared because they heard about a beast. This shows how the hunters are not all they are portrayed to be.

Golding uses the title “shadows and tall trees” for chapter 7 because shadows are only visible in the tall trees. Shadows are also associated with evil and darkness. The title may also show that the atmosphere is dark and scary, and what the scenery around them will look like.

Word study

Furtively (pg. 109) “He looked around, furtively.”

Def: Attempting to avoid notice or attention, typically because of guilt or a belief that discovery would lead to trouble; secretive.

Sen: The boy furtively walked past the security guard.

Diminishing (pg.123) "hung up there immovable on the top of a diminishing, moving mountain."

Def: Make (someone or something) seem less impressive or valuable.

Sen: The trial has aged and diminished him.

Scuttling (pg. 120) “There came the sound of boys scuttling away.”

Def: Run hurriedly or furtively with short quick steps.

Sen: There was a scuttling of feet in every direction.

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Re: Chapter Seven Respones

Post by Shannon Poston on Tue Jun 06, 2017 9:01 pm

Vocabulary & Text Structure
When is figurative language used and to what effect?
Since everyone is so worried about the "beast" every little thin that they hear or see bothers them. Such as the vines that hit them. To the kids the beast is actually the fallen pilot. On page 109, "...then there was a chance that you might put the beast out of mind and dream for a while." They are so focused on the beast that they can't get anything else done. The nightmares they are having are tricking their minds.
How did the author organize the ideas?
In the beginning of the book Jack was afraid to even hunt and eat the pig. Now he wants to go forth and kill this unknown beast. On page 114, "The chant rose ritually, as at the last moment of a dance or a hunt." They were chanting to kill the pig, meaning jack has become savage.
I believe the chapter title is "Shadow and Tall Trees" because the kids do believe in the beast and are so frightened of the beast that every little thing that happens to them reminds them that it could be the beast.
Vocab:
indulged (page 109): "They were bitten down to the quick though he could not remember when he had restarted this habit nor any time when he indulged it."
to yield to an inclination or desire; allow oneself to follow one's will loited: "They went more slowly than Ralph had bargained for; yet in a way he was glad to loiter, cradling his spear." loited: When you stand or wait arround without apparent purpose. : I was loitering the backstreets at night.
brandished (pg. 116) "Jack brandished his spear."
Friendly Definition - wave or flourish (something, especially a weapon) as a threat or in anger or excitement. I brandished my pencil.

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Re: Chapter Seven Respones

Post by Shannon Poston on Tue Jun 06, 2017 9:01 pm

Vocabulary & Text Structure
When is figurative language used and to what effect?
Since everyone is so worried about the "beast" every little thin that they hear or see bothers them. Such as the vines that hit them. To the kids the beast is actually the fallen pilot. On page 109, "...then there was a chance that you might put the beast out of mind and dream for a while." They are so focused on the beast that they can't get anything else done. The nightmares they are having are tricking their minds.
How did the author organize the ideas?
In the beginning of the book Jack was afraid to even hunt and eat the pig. Now he wants to go forth and kill this unknown beast. On page 114, "The chant rose ritually, as at the last moment of a dance or a hunt." They were chanting to kill the pig, meaning jack has become savage.
I believe the chapter title is "Shadow and Tall Trees" because the kids do believe in the beast and are so frightened of the beast that every little thing that happens to them reminds them that it could be the beast.
Vocab:
indulged (page 109): "They were bitten down to the quick though he could not remember when he had restarted this habit nor any time when he indulged it."
to yield to an inclination or desire; allow oneself to follow one's will loited: "They went more slowly than Ralph had bargained for; yet in a way he was glad to loiter, cradling his spear."  loited: When you stand or wait arround without apparent purpose. : I was loitering the backstreets at night.
brandished (pg. 116) "Jack brandished his spear."
Friendly Definition - wave or flourish (something, especially a weapon) as a threat or in anger or excitement. I brandished my pencil.

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Re: Chapter Seven Respones

Post by cesar.ca on Tue Jun 06, 2017 9:18 pm

-Why is chapter 7 called "shadows and tall trees"?
---The shadows in the jungle symbolize their own secret fears. Simon is the only boy who feels differently. Simon is not afraid of darkness or shadows of the forest rather than that of the human spirit. The tall trees and thick foliage of the jungle is a different world for the boys, it seems to bring out the darkness in themselves. We see this in the violent play hunt and when Jack not so jokingly suggests that they hunt littluns.

-What does Ralph ask to Jack?
--- the boys are exploring the island in an attempt to find the beast. Before they are about to climb the mountain, Ralph suggests that someone return to the base camp to inform Piggy where the group is located. Fortunately, Simon volunteers to travel through the forest alone to give the message to Piggy. After Simon leaves, Jack becomes furious as Ralph begins to ask him questions regarding the pig-run. Jack's responses are short, and Ralph can sense the rising antagonism. Ralph then mentions that he is concerned about whether there will be enough light for them to travel safely through the forest. Jack dismisses Ralph's concern by saying, "I don't mind going...I'll go when we get there. Won't you? Would you rather go back to the shelters and tell Piggy?" (Golding 170). Ralph realizes that Jack is attempting to make him look weak and simply asks Jack, "Why do you hate me?" (Golding 170). The rest of the boys become silent as if "something indecent had been said." Ralph then turns around and leads the boys up the mountain.

Key Wors:

1. Crestfallen "Said Jack, crestfallen, "so this must be the bit of the coast I missed."" (117): dispirited and depressed; dejected
2. Impervious "So they sat, the rocking, tapping, impervious Roger and Ralph..." (121): incapable of being penetrated or affected.
3. Enterpise "...and the darkness, and desperate enterprise gave the night a kind of dentist's chair unreality." (122): an undertaking or business organization; industrious

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Re: Chapter Seven Respones

Post by Manthan21 on Thu Jun 08, 2017 9:30 pm

Are there any shifts?
Yes because when people in the book such as the hunters want to hunt to the pig no one is afraid of anything and the think that they are the best ever. but when the people want to hunt the beast everyone chickens out and does nothing.

The author calls the chapter "Shadow and Tall Trees" because shadows are kind of related to evil so it could be called that because of that.

Furtively (pg. 109) "He looked round, furtively."done in a quiet and secretive way to avoid being noticed
Gleaming (pg.113) track toward him, with tusks gleaming and an intimating.
If something is gleaming its shining bright.
Diminishing (pg.123) "...hung up there immovable on the top of a diminishing, moving mount to make or cause to seem smaller, less, less important, etc.; lessen; reduce

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Re: Chapter Seven Respones

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